And the cow jumped over the moon

Jackson has a very special pillow.
We don’t go on any trip without it.
He doesn’t sit in his chair without it.
Well– truth be told it’s not really the PILLOW it’s a pillow CASE

Wait.

Let me go back about 7 years

Clay ( Jackson’s Daddy) is a MAJOR WWI history buff. Specifically the airplanes. He’s the type of guy that when you’re watching a movie says “Oh, that’s a Blah flippity blah blah but that couldn’t have flown THEN  because they hadn’t started production until…….”
Yeah. He’s THAT guy. So he had a t shirt that had an airplane on it. A WWII P40 to be exact. He LOVED this shirt, but it was wearing thin, and Clay was loathe to part with it because the design was so cool. No problem for a crafty dame like myself, I turned it into a simple t shirt pillow.

We weren’t prepared for Jackson to glom on to this pillow. But he did. It became HIS airplane pillow.

He sits in his chair and pats it.  He looks at the plane on it.  He asks for it.

It goes through a cycle of use, wash, repair, use, wash repair,repair repair.

All too soon the t shirt fabric is almost too thin to BE a pillow.  And the batting inside it matted and lumpy and misshapen from repeated washings.

Time to get creative again

I cut away everything BUT the airplane and salvage what I can.
I stabilize it ( oh how I love you SF101)  and affix it to a custom made pillow case that matches the colors and present it to Jack.

Thankfully it  passed the test. It’s been well over two years and its still going strong.

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But……… I have tried breaking the obsession.  I’ve tried introducing other pillows and pillow cases.  I want a back up.  I want something ELSE to be able to take the place……Just in case…

I’ve tried baseballs

I’ve tried Spongebob

Etc etc ad nauseum

I would place the pillow near him and I would get a resounding

Noooooo–ooooo
Loud and clear

But then. I found it

THE fabric that would TOTALLY captivate him!!

I smugly patted myself on the back, ordered the fabric and

TODAY made the pillow cases.

The fabrics? oh just…….Prints of Jacks all time favorite book Goodnight Moon ! Cows jumping over the moon! A red balloon in the great green room !! Pictures from the book.
Perfect images !!
RIGHT?! How much more perfect could it possibly be?!

You have to know–  there are at least 5 copies of Goodnight, moon! in this house.
2 ALWAYS within his reach.

I put one of the pillow cases on the spare pillow. I walk over to the chair.

He sees it and says, “Goodnight moon. La Luna”

I’m ecstatic
I put the pillow on his lap

He says, “No”

His respite worker says, “Jack , see it’s on your pillow – Goodnight moon on your pillow!”

He pushes it away and begins to make a noise that sounds like a vintage Plymouth trying to start on a cold morning.  His voice rises in pitch as he emphatically states . “Nooooo-oooooo!”  pronounced with several syllables.

I take the pillow away.

I am totally bummed  and I chalk it up to his obsession with the airplane pillow .
(Autism 1 Tina 0) I take pictures of the pillowcases and post on social media because I still think they’re pretty cool. And beautiful.

And that’s what we geek sewers do ☺️

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Now it’s night and   we are putting Jack to bed when I remember –” I gotta go retrieve Jacks pillows for bed — Aw heck. I’m not gonna put the old pillowcases back on. I’ll just leave the Goodnight Moon ones on. He never notices pillowcases on the bed.”

Wrong.

Wrong.

Wrong.

Jack  is getting into bed and all we hear is:

“Daddy. The cow jumping over the moon. I see the circles. The moon. The moon. La Luna. The moon Daddy? I see the circles. The cow jumping over the moon.”

His hands would flap. He would look at his pillow case and smile. He was animated. He was communicating. He was engaged and engaging. He kept looking at us.  He kept looking at his pillowcase.  It  went on and on long after the lights went out.

I made him happy.

I made Jackson very, very happy when I had absolutely no expectation to do so and wasn’t trying to.

I wanted Jackson to want that pillow case for his chair and enjoy it it THERE .   He didn’t.

And in my shortsightedness, that’s where I let it end. But that’s not where JACK let it end.

I wonder how often we allow our expectations to limit our enjoyment of something.

I know for Jack , whose head is resting upon pictures of the cow jumping over the moon, who went to sleep saying “Tina the moon the moon the moon Tina “– He taught me -once again – to live in the moment.  Be open to all the joy that is out there.

Fertilizer isn’t just a bunch of crap.

It’s been 10 months since Jack broke his leg.
In that time we have been on a mission to learn more about osteoporosis, drug interactions, growth plates, bone structure, weight-bearing…..
The list goes on.
And on.
And we are laser focused on getting Jack to walk.

In the past month or so we got the go ahead to ramp up physical activity and get Jackson to move more.  To bear weight.  To exercise.
We go once a week  to physical therapy AND to swim therapy TWICE week.
At home I stretch his legs and make him move.
We practice standing up.
We practice putting our arms above our head.
We move.

Jackson and physical therapy is hit and miss.
He tolerates it.
He  is not thrilled with the constant movement.
It has no bearing in his life.  He cannot grasp the concept of these insane movements we put him through.

“Why am I moving over there and back again?  Why are you making me walk backwards? What’s up with this side step thing?!? Get that box out of the way….
Hey.  Just let me sit…….”

But WATER THERAPY!?!
Jackson would spend HOURS in the pool if we let him.

He floats.  He moves.  He’s supported and free.
He yells TIIIIINNNNNNAAAA!! THE WAAAATTTTERRRR! loudly and with joy.

His foot is weighted.  We walk.  We bounce.
We are making great progress.

This past Friday we were able to have Jackson’s teacher peek in on Jack’s physical therapy.  He was impressed.
AND inspired.
So much so that Monday morning when Jack was wheeled into class, Teacher Paul exclaimed, “Jackson!! So good to see you! I loved seeing you walk! Let’s walk!!”
So amid VERY LOUD protestation from Jackson, Teacher Paul and I raised Jack out of the “wheels” and assisted him to his desk, halfway across the classroom.

What happened next was so amazing.
What happened next was so inspiring
What happened next raised my faith in humanity a few more notches.

All the kids (and aids in the classroom) started cheering on Jack.

“You can do it Jack!”
“Go Jackson!!”
“I’m so proud of you Jackson!”

It was with great effort that Jack sat down . When he raised his head to the applause and cheering I was giddy to delight to find Jackson LOVING the verbal support.

He was smiling.
He was grinning like a Cheshire cat.

And the kids in the class were truly happy to see their classmate walking.

It was a spontaneous celebration and I was honored to witness it.

I have been so focused on the end result, I forgot about the journey.

And it got me thinking……
Why don’t we cheer people on more often?
When was the last time you saw someone struggling and gave them encouragement?
When was the last time you saw someone needing a lift and gave it to them?

Positivity doesn’t cost a thing.
And it reaps benefits beyond compare.
Encouragement is an awesome commodity.

Thorton Wilder once said:

“Money is like manure; it’s not worth a thing unless it’s spread around encouraging young things to grow.”

I would possit that the same can be said of love and encouragement.
It’s the best fertilizer around.

Jackson and his classmates reminded me this week that you gain more by giving.

Spread that joy around.
Make things grow.

img_2334Jackson at physical therapy.

Real.

Real.

Ask any autism parent and they will tell you:
when their kid gets fixated on a toy- that’s it.
You better have a back up.
You better not lose it.
You better be able to produce it out of thin air when needed.

In our household there are several standbys that are always handy-
Slinkys, Legos, phone cords, spinnings and books.
And now we can add a new one.
Jackson has decided he has a new favorite toy.  He pokes it, he prods it, he pats it, and he delights in it.  He throws Legos at it.  He laughs at it, and he cuddles with it.

The toy?
Me.

Jackson will request:
“Tina sit with you?”

And so I do.

He will bounce up and down.
He pull up his blanket so it covers us both.
Then?

Then the fun begins.
He will poke my eye and smile.
He will pull on my chin so I am face to face with him.
He will burp on purpose so that I will make a face.
He will pull on my braids and laugh and I make a face.
He will wrap his hand around my necklace and repeat “Tina necklace” over and over.
He will put his arm around my neck and smile broadly at me.
Sometimes we even sing together.

And on it goes– for as long as I will let it.
And how long will I let it?

For as long as Jackson needs it.
For as long as Jackson desires my presence.
For as long as Jackson.

Because THIS toy will not get lost.
THIS toy will not mysteriously disappear.
THIS toy is built to last.

THIS toy is real.

 

“Real isn’t how you are made,” said the Skin Horse. “It’s a thing that happens to you. When a child loves you for a long, long time, not just to play with, but REALLY loves you, then you become Real.”

“Does it hurt?” asked the Rabbit.

“Sometimes,” said the Skin Horse, for he was always truthful. “When you are Real you don’t mind being hurt.”
Margery Williams, The Velveteen Rabbit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gratitude: A way of Life

I get that people are well-meaning.
I do.
They want to commiserate, to show you they understand, to let you know they “get it“.

But the sad truth of the matter is: they really don’t.
9 days ago Jackson had his first grand mal seizure in over three years.

It was a- full-blown – body- shaking -drooling -get -the- rescue- meds seizure.
And then less than 12 hours later? It happened again.
In his sleep.

Thankfully, I sleep with Jackson so it didn’t go by unnoticed and we were able to follow SOP.

I related this to a coworker…..and how yeah….it sucks and I am not getting much sleep.
And Jack is still not walking even though his leg is healed and……
She TOTALLY gets it cause her 7-year-old wets the bed.
And there is sooooo much laundry to do “It’s relentless” she says.

Hmmmmmmmm fear of SUDEP  versus your neurotypical kid wetting the bed…….
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And I went off and pondered.
There are many of you out there that DO get it– fellow TSC moms, special needs parents, and those in our close inner circle that see what it takes to raise Jack.

And yet……
WE have it easy.

Recently the world lost a beautiful soul by the name of Kreed.
Kreed was medically complicated beyond normal standards, but a shining star with two moms whose strength and devotion was beyond compare.
His story and efforts to raise funds to bring him home can be found here on his FaceBook page.  I encourage you to visit if you haven’t before. Go back and read over his life and his struggle. Get to know one of the most joyous and courageous souls you’ll ever meet.

I’ve been at a loss to truly put my emotions into words the last few days.
I look around at the world and I want to scream:  quit fretting about petty bullshit!
Who cares if you can’t find your LuLaRoe unicorn leggings?
Who cares if your coffee at Starbucks didn’t get the full shot of vanilla?
Who gives a good goddamn that ( fill in the blank with whatever you are worrying about at this moment that is not life threatening or has the potential to be)?

I have friends in the TSC community who’s children are in and out of ERs.  Seizures.  A cold that turns into pneumonia and threatens the life of the child and months of progress lost.
I have friends who have to deal with their children’s feeding tubes, complicated medical procedures, and fight the system trying to get services. And yet we as parents and caregivers and sisters and brothers get up every single day and do it all over again.

And so to you that do NOT deal with this?
I say:

Practice an attitude of gratitude.
Realize that — you know what?
Things could be a whole lot worse.
Maybe be grateful that you CAN spontaneously go to Starbucks.
Be grateful that your child who is being too loud– can TALK.
Be grateful.

I have this standard reply I give people when they apologize for something silly:
Like the cashier in the grocery store who apologizes for a wait in line, or when a waiter apologizes for being out of a food item

“if that is the worst thing that happens to me today, then life is pretty damn good”

Be grateful today.
Find your blessings
Because I guarantee you
You have a whole lot of them.

Let your creed be LIVE.
and LIVE JOYFULLY.
Do it for Kreed. Do it for Jack.

Saving grace

It was a cool and overcast afternoon.
Jackson plopped himself down on the couch and stated, “Yes, shoes on.”
Shoes on, then a sweatshirt pulled over his head, he stopped to  pick up a Slinky from the floor.  Then he picked one up from the couch.  And another from over by the door.  (Yes, it is true: our home is lousy with Slinkys) Chubby hands full of Slinkys when Jack spies an “open”.  (to you and I its a wire basket.  to Jackson, it is an “open”)
Hands full, Jackson heads out to the door and settles onto the swing.
He stimmed.  He swang. He rearranged the Slinkys in a pleasing manner, and laughed at the wind.
All of Jacksons motions are deliberate.  There is never a wasted motion.
This continued for a bit and he gathered his treasures and made his way across the yard to the fence line.

I took this moment to sit myself down on the swing and enjoy the afternoon and the view.

And the view?
Jackson playing with his Slinkys by the fence.  His left index finger poked at the corner of his left eye.  His right hand above his head- Slinky bouncing from his fingertips, just grazing the ground.
I call out, “Jackson!! No poke-a- eye!” and his left hand snaps down to his side.
He bends over to pick up another slinky.  It is connected to another Slinky and the wire basket.
I rise to help him.
Then sit.
He hasn’t asked for my help.
I watch him work his way through it. The first Slinky gets set down on the ground and both hands start working on the tangle.  His head tilts to the side with a purpose.  Something about the crosshatch of of the wire basket and the Slinky catches his fancy and he smiles.
His hands work again.  The head tilts.  Another smile.

Soon, Jackson has worked free the tangled Slinky and rises up with two Slinkys — one in each hand.
Standing now, a breeze fluffs his hair as well as the plastic coils.

He is happy with himself.
He is happy with his work.
He is in a moment of grace.

I needed this lesson– to let things unfold– not to rush into solving a problem that wasn’t even a problem.  To remember that Jackson CAN ask for “help with it”– and to let him work out what he can– or chooses to.

Because sometimes a tangled mess of Slinky’s can lead to life’s great lessons.

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A Holiday Message

I have been meaning to write a new entry– really I have.
And then for some odd reason THIS ENTRY of my blog has been getting renewed attention.

It started as a FaceBook note on my private page…..then morphed into a blog entry.
It speaks of routine.  It speaks of family.  It speaks of consistency and sacrifice.
More importantly, it speaks of uncompromising love.

And so, it led me to reflect on the past  two and a half years of writing about my life with Jack.

Through Jack’s page on FaceBook I have met many a righteous parent, child, grandparent, activist and TSC warrior.
We have shared love, support, empathy, understanding, and anecdotes.
We have rejoiced together over our children’s triumphs, and commiserated over the setbacks.

And so to all of you parents out there this Christmas…..
be you the parent of a special needs child , or not
be you the birth parent, or the step parent, or the parent of the heart
I say to you:

Thank you.
Happy Holidays
Take a deep breath
Let it out slow
Smile.

You’re doing great and we’ll get through this together.

The Holidays are rife with warmth and love, the New Year brings the promise of renewed energy.

I thank you all for your love and support.

with love,
T and Captain Jackstastic

RETARD

Yes.  I am titling this blog entry with “THAT” word, because I need your attention please.

First, bear in  mind that I use that word to make you sit up and take notice about what I want to talk about.
I am not using that word to insult, degrade, belittle, compare, or humiliate.  You may read about that distinction of language usage HERE.

Second, I will give you one chance when you use that word to insult, degrade, belittle, compare, or humiliate.  Then I will politely, calmly, and privately pull you aside and explain to you why it is not a good word choice.

I give you that chance because I realize that we have  become numb to the words we use and we don’t always think of the further implications or origins. I get that language is living and evolves and grows and changes.

On Facebook yesterday I privately messaged one of my FB “friends” that his caption under his sisters picture was inappropriate and incredibly offensive as he stated she “Wasn’t as retarded as she looked”.   I gently explained as the mother of a severe special needs child, it was wrong.

His response was two fold:
1.  He was not insulting my child but poking fun at his sister.
2. The word has been in the OED since 1910.

oh.  I see.  So her making a funny face and being called retarded is ok.  Because yeah– my child never makes that face (uncontrollably, by the way) and you didn’t mean ANY offense to special needs kids ANYWhere……
except that you obviously used it to poke fun, insult, degrade, compare, and/or humiliate your sister (even in “good fun”)

Second, there are loooooooooooots of words in the OED.
171,476  words in current use, and 47,156 obsolete words. To this may be added around 9,500 derivative words included as subentries. So just because it’s IN THE DICTIONARY, doesn’t mean that is a “good word” to use.
Hey!!
I tell you what– THIS WORD is in the dictionary too.
Wanna use THAT?

Of course you don’t.  Because it’s wrong and unacceptable.

That is the way we have to start thinking about the word I used in the title of this blog.

AND, if we are going by the standard of “oh hey, it’s in the dictionary….”
CHECK THIS OUT:
The Almighty Oxford English Dictionary FIRST defines it as a modifier:
Delay or hold back in terms of progress, development, or accomplishment:  his progress was retarded by his limp

Second?
as a noun:

INFORMAL OFFENSIVE

A mentally handicapped person (often used as a general term of abuse).
Oh hey.  CHECK THAT OUT!!
OED specifically stated that it is OFFENSIVE and a TERM OF ABUSE.
As this FB “friend” puffed himself up and tried to show me how “smart” he was I just said:
Barney? Goodbye
And blocked is ignorant ass.
So, lets save the word “retard” for its use solely as a transitive verb.
Oh, and if you are looking for words for describe my son– or other “special needs” persons?
Here are a few:
adaptable
adventurous
affable
affectionate
agreeable
ambitious
amiable
amicable
amusing
brave
bright
broad-minded
calm
careful
charming
communicative
compassionate
conscientious
considerate
convivial
courageous
courteous
creative
decisive
determined
diligent
diplomatic
discreet
dynamic
easygoing
emotional
energetic
enthusiastic
exuberant
fair-minded
faithful
fearless
forceful
frank
friendly
funny
generous
gentle
good
gregarious
hard-working
helpful
honest
humorous
imaginative
impartial
independent
intellectual
intelligent
intuitive
inventive
kind
loving
loyal
modest
neat
nice
optimistic
passionate
patient
persistent
pioneering
philosophical
placid
plucky
polite
powerful
practical
pro-active
quick-witted
quiet
rational
reliable
reserved
resourceful
romantic
self-confident
self-disciplined
sensible
sensitive
shy
sincere
sociable
straightforward
sympathetic
thoughtful
tidy
tough
unassuming
understanding
versatile
warmhearted
willing
witty

Do YOU see the fan?

I took Jack to the grocery store the other day.
We were out of chips.

This was not Jack’s first foray out of the house that day , so he was a wee bit cranky.
And, this was not one of his usual grocery stops– this was a different store.
But what I could I do?
We needed a specific brand of chips.   Autism parents, YOU know what I am talking about.

So we get into the store and start shopping — IMMEDIATELY Jack is enthralled by the huge row of ceiling fans in the store.
He is mesmerized and I am hard pressed to navigate the store with Jack because wherever we go he HAS to see the fan.

We finally make our way to the check out and Jack is beside himself with happiness as he has a perfect view of THE FAN!
And so he starts laughing and shouting
“I see the Faaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaan!”
He stims a little.
Laughs.
Rocks a little.
Shouts once again: “Faaaaaaaan! I see the Fan!”

I am smiling.  Laughing.  And going about my business of putting the chips on the conveyor belt.
That is when I notice her.

Her.  The woman behind us in line.
She is doing every thing she can NOT to acknowledge us.  She is painstakingly looking away. Down.  Up.  Everywhere except in our vicinity– which is hard , because we are RIGHT NEXT TO HER. It is apparent that this is not what she bargained for when she came in to get her bread and milk.

Now I get that not everyone is comfortable being around special needs children OR adults.
I was not expecting her to become my BFF while we bonded over Jackson shouting FAN in the grocery store.

I realize that Jack and I threw a monkey wrench into her grocery shopping experience.

Which is too bad.
Because she was missing out on a little bit of happiness .

Had she actually peeked over at us she would have saw paroxysms of pure delight.
She could have shared some of that delight if only for a few seconds

Instead she did everything in her power to NOT see it.
Sheer delight and pure happiness was right there next to her and she turned away.

I invite you all to cast off expectations in the moment, to open your eyes to the world outside your comfort zone.
You may just find a bit happiness of your own.

Also?
We WILL smile back you.  I promise.

 

Falling for the boy

Well crap.

Jackson took a fall and broke a toe.

We thought he was running for a split second.  Until we realized that he was falling.  And then neither of us could get to him in time.  It was that super slow motion thing that makes you realize how quickly things can change.

Pavement 1, Jackson 0.

He’s got some lovely road rash to show for it too.

But I have to say:
Our little man is a trooper to be sure.  He doesn’t let much get him down.
My husband tells me that right after his brain surgery at 5 years of age, he tried to get up and indicated he wanted home.

Even as we assisted Jack in walking right after the fall he would look at us plaintively and say: Fix it? Tina! Fix it.

*heart broken*
Sorry, buddy, Tina can’t fix it.

But here we are five days past.  We’ve been to a doctor, we’ve been xrayed, and we are on our way to recovery.

Jack is once again, teaching me a good lesson.
He is same as he ever was.
And while I have had to give up a some (ok- ALOT) of sewing time to help him.
And I am not getting as much housework done as I could be on this break……

I am spending more time just hanging with the boy.
Talking.
Communicating.
Learning new things. (not to mention, fetching and waiting on Jack ‘s every whim and will.  🙂   )

And who cares if my sewing room remains in disarray?
Who cares if my floor is a little “crunchy”?
Who cares if that stack of sewing projects sits for a bit?
This is the here.
This is the now.
And sometimes you need a reminder that you need to put your feet up
(especially the one with the broken toe)
and be at one with the world around you.

Thank you Zen Master Jackson.

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Destination: Hope

Today I turn my blog over to an extraordinary woman name Fatima.
She lives here in Eureka, with her husband, two boys, and two dogs she rarely has time to pet.She is extraordinary because she holds down a very grown up job (honestly…..she wears nice clothes and sits behind a desk in a fancy office……), she runs an amazing organization called FAANFamilies Advocating Autism Now that has sensory friendly movie events, gifts iPads to classrooms, and so much more.Oh yeah.  And she’s a special needs mom.
Heck.  I’m tired just reading her credentials.

I’ve been bugging her for a year or so to guest write for me.
The other day she posted about her son’s IEP and I thought: THIS is the one.  THIS is the story that needs to be told.
Why?
Because in all the autism / TSC groups I belong to– there are three letters that strike fear, terror, anger, and frustration into the hearts of special needs parents: IEP. Individual Education Plan.

THIS IEP had a happy ending.
THIS is a story of hope.
THIS is a story keeping you eye on the prize
AND?
It’s got pictures of her son, who I fell in love with when I work in the PALs program.
A little cutie patatootie sitting on the rug, flipping through pages of a book with his effervescent smile and indomitable spirit.

Readers?
May I introduce to you,
the lovely Fatima…..
**********************************************************
To do a guest blog or not to do a guest blog?
My goal in the beginning  of writing this was to be witty and sound semi-  intelligent, now I just want to get through it without losing my dinner. 🙂

My amazing son, Caden was diagnosed with Fragile X Syndrome at the age of one and Autism at the age of two.  He has a wonderful little brother, Tate that was diagnosed with Fragile X at the super young age of 3 months.  The road has been windy, long, scary and has had so many twists and  turns that I have wanted to get off it many times.

 The light at the end of the tunnel must not have been in service during the first 2 years ofCaden’s diagnosis. (or so we thought)

Now fast forward at least 5 years…. Caden is 8 and I can see all that he has to offer to his family, his friends, and…..
THE WORLD.
This kids is destined for greatness…..
Today was a big day for our family.
We had an IEP (individualized education plan)  meeting for Caden to be fully mainstreamed in the Fall at Washington Elementary. For those of you that don’t know what that means– Caden will be in the regular ed classroom for the day, with necessary breaks, etc., as needed.   Currently, he is in special day and is mainstreamed.You couldn’t have told me a year ago that this day would come. Not because I didn’t believe in Caden, but because I didn’t know how many roadblocks we would be up against.
 His very first IEP was with 22 people in a large conference room with the air conditioner on in January of 2009.  Who the heck needs an air conditioner in Humboldt County?  We were nervous, uncomfortable and freezing our asses off.  All we wanted to do was to make sure our son received the best possible education.
Easy? Not so much!
Three hours later, my husband and I walked out of there dumbfounded.  What the heck had just happened?  Yes, Caden had received the services that we requested, but there was so much red tape, so many unsmiling faces, just so much.. SHIT.    It was a sad day, and I remember crying for a long time that night dreaming of what our future was going to look like.
Fight after fight.   Could we handle this? Were we equipped to handle it?  Did I really even want to handle this?My, how things have changed…..In this IEP meeting we discussed Caden’s growth and also the challenges that he will face. But, as a TEAM (yes, a real team) we decided that mainstreaming him is in his very best interest. By the end of the meeting, most of us all were in tears.

Happy tears.
Caden’s aide (not a worthy name for her at all) is truly amazing and she knows when he needs her support and when he can “fly” on his own. Caden’s 2nd grade teacher has truly shown our family what I can expect for him. She has paved the way for Caden to excel in anything he chooses to do. His classmates are amazing and I will thank his teacher for the rest of her life for showing them how to accept/love/share/cherish  Caden as their friend. The sky is the limit for him and we are so blessed that we have a school that will support Caden in being the best student he can be.
“Love recognizes no barriers. It jumps hurdles, leaps fences, penetrates walls to arrive at its destination full of hope.” Maya Angelou
 cadenCadenhappy